Essay Sample About Social Aspects of the Activity

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Social Aspects of the Activity: A Child in a School Uniform Playing at the Schoolyard

Introduction

Daily activities involve quite a number of social aspects. This is mostly as a result of daily activities involving socialization with other people. One notable daily activity is playing among children. As such, this paper will discuss the social aspects of a child in a school uniform playing at the schoolyard. Playful behavior of a child at the school, or anywhere else, has positive social effects on the child. Actually, play may act as a vital mode of learning for the kid. From the time children are born, they usually learn and develop social skills through their relationships and interactions with others. Most of these relationships and interactions that a child experiences mostly occur when a child is playing with other children. Lack of positive interactions in children has been associated with negative consequences in life such as depression, withdrawal, anxiety, and loneliness (Ostrosky and Meadan 2010, p. 104). This means that when a child plays, he or she gains multiple social benefits and avoids such negative consequences of lacking positive interactions with peers.

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Social Aspects of a Child in a School Uniform Playing at the Schoolyard

The key social aspects of a child playing at the school yard are development of negotiation, cooperation, and sharing skills, which are vital social skills. To start with, developing better negotiation skills is a vital social aspect of a child playing. Social development is a continuous process of growth that takes place across a person’s lifespan. Early childhood is a period when the brain grows rapidly from early childhood experiences, especially while playing. Early childhood offers the blueprint for all the future development and learning (KidsMatter Early Childhood n. d, p. 22). Developing negotiation skills in childhood is very important. Negotiating involves coming together in agreement whereby all parties get what they really want, such that they are in a win-win situation (Woodcock n. d, n. p). When a child plays with peers, he or she can be in a better position to trust his or her peers. This is because the children can establish mutual trust between each other, such that when a conflict develops among them, they can be able to solve it as they trust each other. Since playing among children involves them working together, they can come up with a compromise solution that would suit everyone’s interests. If a child is able to develop good negotiation skills while playing, the skills would assist the child throughout his or her personal life and not just in childhood. By being an effective negotiator, a child would be able to build and maintain relationships at school, which is important in learning. Instead of the child spending lots of time arguing with peers, the child would be in a better position to push peers in reaching agreements, thereby finding solutions to problems even in the absence of a teacher or parent. Children often find themselves in conflicts with their peers. Conflicts can add anxiety and tension among the children. However, as they play, they are able to reach to alternatives than ensure their issues are negotiated as their relationships are improved while they play. When a child plays, especially with other children, attachments can be formed when the child finds other children with similar interests. This can lead to friendships. Friendship is defined as a mutual relationship that involves sharing, companionship, and understanding of feelings and thoughts, and comforting or caring one another during times of need (Preusse 2007, p. 2). Through development of friendship while playing, the bonds created make it easier for the children to negotiate with one another as they play or conflict.
The second social aspect of a child playing at the schoolyard is improvement of cooperation skills. When watching a child play at the schoolyard, the child interacts with his or her peers. Instances of cooperation can be seen as they play while at some instances they can scream to each other. As they play more, they learn to cooperate more. Benefits of cooperation arise when individuals agree to involve themselves in actions that lead to positive externalities and when individuals agree to avoid actions that lead to negative externalities (Heath n. d, p. 5). They key obvious form of cooperation that can be seen through play among children the fact that not all play activities can be done by just one child. For instance, a child would need peers to play soccer and may not be able to play alone. This means that children would have to come together to play some games, meaning they can only be able to play through cooperation. If they fail to cooperate while playing, they would not achieve their aim of playing a good soccer game. Since they would want their play to be a success, they cooperate. Research shows that people may achieve benefits when they arrange tasks among themselves (Heath n. d, p. 7). This means that when children play and arrange tasks of play among themselves, they would benefit out of that cooperation. People do not always have similar abilities. While one kid can do well as a goalkeeper, the other may do well as a striker as they play soccer. When they cooperate, they are be able to satisfy their preferences, for instance in a goalkeeper or striker role while playing soccer. When a child plays cooperatively with peers, challenges, discoveries, and successes are usually shared. The emphasis of play among children is participating and acceptance, bringing about joy of playing. In the end, it is the relationship that a child has with peers that counts. As a child cooperates with peers while playing, the child develops stronger bonds with his or her playmates. As a child plays with peers, there is competition to be the winner but when they play cooperatively, they play towards a mutual goal. Competition often leads to arguments, separation and hurt feelings. But as a child plays with peers, cooperation is gained the child feels encouraged and supported. The child would feel he or she is developing a stronger personal identity. The child would be more flexible in thinking and be more willing to come up with more creative solutions. The result is personal confident, enjoyment, and feeling worthy.
The third social aspect of a child playing at a schoolyard is development of sharing skills. As a child plays with peers, play items can be exchanged. For instance, one child may have a play item that the other does not have. They would wish to play with the other person’s play item, such that they end up exchanging their play items. As a result, they enjoy playing together and sharing play items. They learn that whenever they exchange play items, they find pleasure. As a result, they learn the benefits of sharing. Sharing is described as letting another person use something belonging to you (Kane 2014, n. p). Generally, sharing makes a person feel good. A child who gives a play item to another would automatically have a good feeling as he or she makes a peer happy. Though some people may feel that they are losing while giving, the reality is that out of giving, a person is able to feel authentic, such that the person would feel better. Research shows that when people share, their brains usually release a hormone known as oxytocin, which is commonly called the “cuddle” or “feel good” hormone which usually relieves stress (Kane 2014, n. p). Through play, children would thereby express who they really are such that they can connect with others and thereby improve their overall well-being. Research shows that people who often practice gratitude or appreciation become happier and healthier (Kane 2014, n. p). While children play, they share play items and once they show appreciation for being given play items by their peers, they would then feel happier and healthier. The more children share while playing, the more gratitude they bring into their lives. Through play, a child would also benefit from getting to know peers better, making friends, and finding new ways to relate with peers.

Conclusion

Daily activities have various social aspects. A child in a school uniform playing at the schoolyard is one example of a daily activity that has some key social aspects. The key social aspects of a child playing at the school yard are development of negotiation, cooperation, and sharing skills, which are vital social skills. Negotiating involves coming together in agreement whereby all parties get what they really want, such that they are in a win-win situation. If a child is able to develop good negotiation skills while playing, the skills would assist the child throughout his or her personal life and not just in childhood. When watching a child play at the schoolyard, the child interacts with his or her peers. As they play more, they learn to cooperate more. As a child plays with peers, play items can be exchanged. As a result, they learn the benefits of sharing such as making them feel good, authentic and gratitude.

Reference List

Heath, J n. d, ‘The Benefits of Cooperation’, University of Toronto, pp. 1-49.
Kane, C 2014, 5 Benefits of Sharing. [online] Everyday Feminism. Available at: http://everydayfeminism.com/2014/03/5-benefits-of-sharing/ [Accessed 9 Jan. 2015].
KidsMatter Early Childhood n. d, ‘Component 2: Developing Children’s Social and Emotional Skills’, KidsMatter Early Childhood, pp. 21-50.
Ostrosky, M., & Meaden, H 2010, ‘Helping Children Play and Learn Together’, Young Children, pp. 104-110.
Preusse, K 2007, ‘Fostering Pro-social Behavior in Young Children’, Early Childhood News, pp. 1-6.

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